Urban Age Award 2010 Mexiko-Stadt

The winner of the 4th Urban Age Award, which was presented in Mexico City on 22 July 2010, shows how citizen initiatives — in strong alliance with universities, local authorities, and other organizations — can promote community life and substantially improve the urban environment and living conditions in megacities.

Mexico City faces big social, economic, environmental, and management challenges. It is a city that has dramatically expanded through informality and has faced natural disasters as well as an economic crisis, which brought about a remarkable increase in violence and the subsequent abandonment of public space. But despite all of these difficulties, the city also records an improvement in quality life at the local level, largely due to citizens who build the city with their own hands and shape the future through the search for the common good.
Emanating from a range of social and geographical backgrounds, the 193 entries for the fourth cycle of the Deutsche Bank Urban Age award suggested the existence of strong and diverse alliances aimed at improving the urban environment and quality of life. The support of universities, local authorities and government programmes, as well as the cooperation of different community organizations, has been an important factor in the success of these projects.
Marcel Ebrard

 Mexico City's Mayor Marcelo Ebrard with the Urban Age Award winners of the Asamblea Comunitaria de Miravalle.

The award winner Asamblea Comunitaria de Miravalle (Miravalle Community Council) reactivates public space within the city’s border through a comprehensive project that includes culture, education, health, employment, and recycling programs.
winners miravalle
The winners of the Asamblea Comunitaria de Miravalle celebrate their award.
Miravalle recycling
Miravalle supervises a solid waste management project involving the collection and recycling of two tonnes of PET plastic per week, generating employment for 30 young people.
Founded in the borough of Iztapalapa — a historically poor neighbourhood in the east of the city — by indigenous people from different ethnic backgrounds who recently migrated into the city, Miravalle is a community-based project that facilitates partnerships between local and metropolitan organisations and local individuals. It supervises a solid waste management project involving the collection and recycling of two tonnes of PET plastic per week, which generates employment for 30 young people. It also oversees a cultivation project that provides fresh produce, in particular vegetables, for a low-budget lunchroom, ensuring healthy nutrition. A comprehensive project, Miravelle also offers a wide variety of sport and cultural services — art workshops, dance classes, a skateboarding park — as well as an education programme aimed at helping residents overcome the technological gap.
Miravalle cooking

 Miravalle also oversees a cultivation project that provides fresh produce, in particular vegetables, for a low-budget lunchroom, ensuring healthy nutrition.

The gang cooperation project Centro Cultural Consejo Agrarista, which acknowledges the existence of gangs as a legitimate means of collective identity and which promotes legal graffiti and artistic work as an alternative to drugs, crime and violence, as well as the public space recovery initiative Recuperando Espacios para la Vida received special mentions.
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